The Debate: Barack Obama’s Most Important Statement


Why bother weighing in with just one more take on Friday night’s Presidential Debate? By now, every conceivable angle has been covered. Predictably, both camps have claimed victories. What could be said that hasn’t already been said, and said by more astute pundits than myself?
Well, there is one little thing. One little sentence that sticks out in my mind and just will not go away. One small phrase which Obama uttered that to me has more significance than everything else he stated during this contest. And here it is: “America is the greatest country in the world, but–” But. That’s the word that matters, folks. That’s the word that more than any other reveals the goals of this candidate. America, he goes on to explain, is not the same country it was when his Kenyan father spoke of America with those high expectations. Children around the world no longer look at America the same way. This, then, would be the sacred crusade of an Obama presidency: to restore that faded luster to our American star. To get people around the world to like us once again. To make it possible for his wife to be truly proud to be an American for the first time in her lifetime. Barack Obama sees it as his mission to make it up to the world for all of America’s past transgressions. To make America more universalist.

My God. Where has this man learned his American history? From the Reverend Wrights of this world? Is this what we want? What we need right now? Is this the new America? A regretful America, ashamed of itself and of its history? A humbled America, apologizing to the world for its existence and for its success? Do we really want a more internationalist America, an America more beholden to the world’s agenda than to our own? Do we really want to relinquish more of our sacred national identity?

Just ask the poor betrayed Brits how they like their new found internationalism. Their merging of cultures and their loss of their own. Ask the Brits how they feel about the EU and Brussels.

What a President Obama would do about the present financial crisis on Wall Street is important, very important. What a President Obama would do about the emerging Russian Bear, or the crazy Atom Bomb-coveting Iranian Mullahs is very important. His views on the best way to manage the GWOT are extremely important. But, to this particular writer, his stated vision of America and what he wants America to be could very well be the most important issue of them all.

Regardless of your party affiliation, if you feel, as I do, that the United States of America owes no one any apologies, and has every right to promote its own interests and to protect those interests, without interference from any foreign powers or organizations of foreign powers, then we just cannot let this man win the presidency. We cannot give away this great nation of ours this easily. – rg

The Debate: Barack Obama’s Most Important Statement


Why bother weighing in with just one more take on Friday night’s Presidential Debate? By now, every conceivable angle has been covered. Predictably, both camps have claimed victories. What could be said that hasn’t already been said, and said by more astute pundits than myself?
Well, there is one little thing. One little sentence that sticks out in my mind and just will not go away. One small phrase which Obama uttered that to me has more significance than everything else he stated during this contest. And here it is: “America is the greatest country in the world, but–” But. That’s the word that matters, folks. That’s the word that more than any other reveals the goals of this candidate. America, he goes on to explain, is not the same country it was when his Kenyan father spoke of America with those high expectations. Children around the world no longer look at America the same way. This, then, would be the sacred crusade of an Obama presidency: to restore that faded luster to our American star. To get people around the world to like us once again. To make it possible for his wife to be truly proud to be an American for the first time in her lifetime. Barack Obama sees it as his mission to make it up to the world for all of America’s past transgressions. To make America more universalist.

My God. Where has this man learned his American history? From the Reverend Wrights of this world? Is this what we want? What we need right now? Is this the new America? A regretful America, ashamed of itself and of its history? A humbled America, apologizing to the world for its existence and for its success? Do we really want a more internationalist America, an America more beholden to the world’s agenda than to our own? Do we really want to relinquish more of our sacred national identity?

Just ask the poor betrayed Brits how they like their new found internationalism. Their merging of cultures and their loss of their own. Ask the Brits how they feel about the EU and Brussels.

What a President Obama would do about the present financial crisis on Wall Street is important, very important. What a President Obama would do about the emerging Russian Bear, or the crazy Atom Bomb-coveting Iranian Mullahs is very important. His views on the best way to manage the GWOT are extremely important. But, to this particular writer, his stated vision of America and what he wants America to be could very well be the most important issue of them all.

Regardless of your party affiliation, if you feel, as I do, that the United States of America owes no one any apologies, and has every right to promote its own interests and to protect those interests, without interference from any foreign powers or organizations of foreign powers, then we just cannot let this man win the presidency. We cannot give away this great nation of ours this easily. – rg

Myth vs Fact

Myth Fact
Islam: Religion of peace. Malik’s Muwatta Book 21, Number 21.1.1:

Yahya related to me from Malik from Abu’z-Zinad from al-Araj from Abu Hurayra that the Messenger of Allah, may Allah bless him and grant him peace, said “Someone who does jihad in the way of Allah is like someone who fasts and prays constantly and who does not slacken from his prayer and fasting until he returns.

Tafsir

Master Gunner has "thoughts" :)


Yes! Master Gunner watched the debate, and he is pissed off (well, as pissed off as he gets…lol) You really should go read why. THEN, tell me if you are as mad as I am..

You know the link: here.

For those who don’t know, Master Gunner is the creator, co-author on the milblog Tanker Bros. Tanker Bros was my first milblog home.:) MG has done two tours in Iraq, alongside his brother who is the other Tanker brother…they both have cred, and I ALWAYS respect what they have to say.

Below this post – on both Tanker Bros and my own site – are a couple of other MUST READ posts from Master Gunner. Read them, too..

Master Gunner has "thoughts" :)


Yes! Master Gunner watched the debate, and he is pissed off (well, as pissed off as he gets…lol) You really should go read why. THEN, tell me if you are as mad as I am..

You know the link: here.

For those who don’t know, Master Gunner is the creator, co-author on the milblog Tanker Bros. Tanker Bros was my first milblog home.:) MG has done two tours in Iraq, alongside his brother who is the other Tanker brother…they both have cred, and I ALWAYS respect what they have to say.

Below this post – on both Tanker Bros and my own site – are a couple of other MUST READ posts from Master Gunner. Read them, too..

The Choice of Ole Miss To Host This Evening’s Debate Sends a Message to the World: Here We Go Again

For Ole Miss, presidential debate marks racial progress

School tries to overcome history of segregation
In this Oct. 2, 1962 photo [above], students crowded the car carrying James Meredith to the University of Mississippi campus in Oxford. He had to be escorted by the National Guard and US marshals. (Associated Press/File)
By Emily Wagster Pettus

For Ole Miss, presidential debate marks racial progress

Boston Globe

OXFORD, Miss. – Two generations ago, bullets flew and tear gas canisters exploded among the magnolias as segregationists fought federal authorities over the court-ordered admission of the first black student to the University of Mississippi.
It was the flagship school in what was then the most defiantly white supremacist state in the union. Now, Ole Miss is a diverse university where racial conflict is a topic for history classes, not a fact of everyday life, and it is hosting the first presidential debate featuring a black nominee for a major party.

“I think what we have here is really a confluence of two lines of history, where you have a new Ole Miss, a postracial Ole Miss, and you have a postracial black candidate running for president,” said David Sansing, professor emeritus of history at the university. “Nowhere in America could these two forces reinforce each other as they do here at Ole Miss.”

Barack Obama was a 14-month-old toddler in Hawaii when James Meredith, a 29-year-old Air Force veteran, broke the color barrier at the University of Mississippi in the fall of 1962.

Ole Miss chancellor Robert Khayat welcomes the Sept. 26 debate between Obama and John McCain as a chance to show the world an up-to-date image of the school. He recognizes that some people’s only impression comes from grainy black-and-white footage from 46 years ago.

“It took a lot of years for the university to get beyond that. But we’ve done it,” said Khayat.

—————————————————–
A note from Radarsite: This choice of Ole Miss to host the 2008 presidential debates is a symbolic gesture to the world which may in fact be the most determinate factor of this entire campaign. This is what it’s all about,folks. Sending a message to the world. We are telling the world that we’re sorry. We’re admitting our past failures and our primary responsibility for most of the world’s present day problems. Our shameful record of racism and white supremacism has finally been overcome. Just look at us now, world. Look at how far we have come.
For those people here in America and around the world who truly embrace this view of the racist imperialistic United States, this message is probably even more important than the outcome of these debates. For no matter how our symbolic candidate performs tonight, his devotees will not be changing their minds or their votes. They are convinced that America is the problem in this world, and that the only solution to this problem lies in changing what it means to be an American. And Barack Hussein Obama personifies America’s unqualified acceptance of its historical guilt and its commitment to change.
God help us all.

The Choice of Ole Miss To Host This Evening’s Debate Sends a Message to the World: Here We Go Again

For Ole Miss, presidential debate marks racial progress

School tries to overcome history of segregation
In this Oct. 2, 1962 photo [above], students crowded the car carrying James Meredith to the University of Mississippi campus in Oxford. He had to be escorted by the National Guard and US marshals. (Associated Press/File)
By Emily Wagster Pettus

For Ole Miss, presidential debate marks racial progress

Boston Globe

OXFORD, Miss. – Two generations ago, bullets flew and tear gas canisters exploded among the magnolias as segregationists fought federal authorities over the court-ordered admission of the first black student to the University of Mississippi.
It was the flagship school in what was then the most defiantly white supremacist state in the union. Now, Ole Miss is a diverse university where racial conflict is a topic for history classes, not a fact of everyday life, and it is hosting the first presidential debate featuring a black nominee for a major party.

“I think what we have here is really a confluence of two lines of history, where you have a new Ole Miss, a postracial Ole Miss, and you have a postracial black candidate running for president,” said David Sansing, professor emeritus of history at the university. “Nowhere in America could these two forces reinforce each other as they do here at Ole Miss.”

Barack Obama was a 14-month-old toddler in Hawaii when James Meredith, a 29-year-old Air Force veteran, broke the color barrier at the University of Mississippi in the fall of 1962.

Ole Miss chancellor Robert Khayat welcomes the Sept. 26 debate between Obama and John McCain as a chance to show the world an up-to-date image of the school. He recognizes that some people’s only impression comes from grainy black-and-white footage from 46 years ago.

“It took a lot of years for the university to get beyond that. But we’ve done it,” said Khayat.

—————————————————–
A note from Radarsite: This choice of Ole Miss to host the 2008 presidential debates is a symbolic gesture to the world which may in fact be the most determinate factor of this entire campaign. This is what it’s all about,folks. Sending a message to the world. We are telling the world that we’re sorry. We’re admitting our past failures and our primary responsibility for most of the world’s present day problems. Our shameful record of racism and white supremacism has finally been overcome. Just look at us now, world. Look at how far we have come.
For those people here in America and around the world who truly embrace this view of the racist imperialistic United States, this message is probably even more important than the outcome of these debates. For no matter how our symbolic candidate performs tonight, his devotees will not be changing their minds or their votes. They are convinced that America is the problem in this world, and that the only solution to this problem lies in changing what it means to be an American. And Barack Hussein Obama personifies America’s unqualified acceptance of its historical guilt and its commitment to change.
God help us all.