Valour-IT and Delta Bravo Sierra

Delta Bravo Sierra is a daily comic strip from the brain of Mr Hooah! His wife, Mrs Hooah! (Claire) has her own blog which is where you can find DBS (and I write there, too!)

Today’s strip is so wonderful, and relates to Valour-IT, so I HAD to share it with you all:

Be sure to check out Knee Deep in the Hooah! here. And if you have your own blog, why not add DBS in your own sidebar. I proudly have it on mine.:)

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B*N*S*N1

The Senate confirmed the promotion of Lt. Gen. Ann E. Dunwoody to four-star general July 23. Dunwoody will take over command of the U.S. Army Materiel Command, Fort Belvoir, Va., Nov. 14. Photo by U.S. Army

First female four-star general to be promoted Friday

FORT BELVOIR, Va. (AMC News Service, Nov. 7, 2008) – Lt. Gen. (promotable) Ann E. Dunwoody will become the first female four-star general in U.S. military history Friday, and later that day will assume command of the U.S. Army Materiel Command from Gen. Benjamin S. Griffin in a 2 p.m. ceremony at the AMC headquarters parade field.

Army Chief of Staff Gen. George W. Casey Jr. will preside over the ceremony, which will include a 17-gun salute, the AMC Band and the AMC ceremonial color guard.

Dunwoody will be promoted as the first woman four-star general in the U.S. military in a ceremony at the Pentagon earlier in the day….(read more here).

B*N*S*N1

The Senate confirmed the promotion of Lt. Gen. Ann E. Dunwoody to four-star general July 23. Dunwoody will take over command of the U.S. Army Materiel Command, Fort Belvoir, Va., Nov. 14. Photo by U.S. Army

First female four-star general to be promoted Friday

FORT BELVOIR, Va. (AMC News Service, Nov. 7, 2008) – Lt. Gen. (promotable) Ann E. Dunwoody will become the first female four-star general in U.S. military history Friday, and later that day will assume command of the U.S. Army Materiel Command from Gen. Benjamin S. Griffin in a 2 p.m. ceremony at the AMC headquarters parade field.

Army Chief of Staff Gen. George W. Casey Jr. will preside over the ceremony, which will include a 17-gun salute, the AMC Band and the AMC ceremonial color guard.

Dunwoody will be promoted as the first woman four-star general in the U.S. military in a ceremony at the Pentagon earlier in the day….(read more here).

B*N*S*N2

Schools bringing hope to Iraq
Thursday, 13 November 2008

By Kendal Smith
Gulf Region Central district

Baghdad, Iraq – Themes of hope dominate school openings and ribbon cutting events throughout Iraq. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ Gulf Region Division has overseen the renovation or new construction of nearly 1,100 schools, and another 38 are still in construction.

“This ancient civilization of Mesopotamia between the two rivers taught the world how to read and how to write,” said Ahmed Rubayee, director general of Baghdad’s Rusafa secondary education department at Al Neel School, which opened in July. “That is what we are doing here today, establishing a school – and to once again be civilized and concentrate on teaching our children to read and write.”

With the same theme of hope in a stable civilization for education, a new wing of six classrooms for Al Abrar primary school, south of Baghdad, opened for students on Oct. 15. Located in the Mahmoudiyah Qada district, this $496,000 project adds much needed classroom space and facilities for this rural area.

“The ribbon cutting for this school not only signals the completion of a building, it signals one small addition of hope for the Iraqi people,” said Col. Ron Light, Gulf Region Central district commander. “While we are here to celebrate the completion of a school, more importantly, you can see the faces of hope on the children. You see the joy of being at a decent school, and that is exciting.”

The school has more than 650 students, but due to a lack of teachers, can only conduct one crowded session. At the ceremony, Al Abrar’s headmaster, Mahmoud Alewee said, “This new building serves us well since the school was never expanded from its beginning in 1960 until now, but we need more rooms.” …(read more here)

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Soldiers and members of a color guard render honors before a Veterans Day re-enlistment ceremony for 274 servicemembers on Joint Base Balad, Iraq, November 11th, 2008
US Army photo by Kiyoshi Freeman

Hundreds of Servicemembers Re-enlist During Veterans Day Ceremony
Thursday, 13 November 2008

JOINT BASE BALAD — Nearly 300 servicemembers stationed across Iraq gathered at Holt Stadium here Tuesday to re-enlist in what officials said is the largest mass re-enlistment in the base’s history.

After helicopter and convoy movements and rehearsals, 274 servicemembers swore oaths to defend their country again.

“We gather today to remind ourselves that our mission as fighting men and women must continue,” Army Brig. Gen. Michael Lally, commander of 3rd Sustainment Command and the host for the event, said. “To continue, we must have those that are willing, able and are inspired to raise their hands again and again to be counted with those that came before them.”

To the re-enlisting servicemembers, the significance of holding the ceremony on Veterans Day was important.

“Every Veterans Day has been big for us in uniform,” said Army Sgt. Juan Rojas, a cook with the 297th ITC and a Miami native. “It gives me great pleasure to be here and be part of history.”

Army Col. Kevin O’Connell, commander of 1st Sustainment Brigade, said Soldiers stay in the Army for the same reasons they join: training, education, adventure, money. But the most important reason they stay in the military is service to their nation, he added.

“They’re patriotic,” O’Connell said. “They want to serve in an all-volunteer Army … to give back to a great nation what it’s given to them.”

While she was not planning to make the Army her career, said Army Sgt. Latasha Myers, a mechanic with the 503rd Maintenance Company, her experiences and the people she works with inspired her to re-enlist.

“I love what I do,” she said. “I love fighting for my country.”

O’Connell said friends and families should be proud of what their sons and daughters did this day.

“They re-enlisted on a big day, while they’re in combat. They continue to serve when their nation needs them — when we’re in conflict,” he said. “They’re our future.”

Lally said the re-enlisting servicemembers are common men and women who always have done, and will continue to do, uncommon things.

“The stories of those in front of you are still being written,” he said. “Today another chapter has begun. Wherever they go, whatever they do, each story will be different. Each will contain trials and deployments, and tales from lands yet to be seen. However, the common theme in each will be their selfless service and their universal commitment.”

(American Forces Press Service)

(source)

B*N*S*N3

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Soldiers and members of a color guard render honors before a Veterans Day re-enlistment ceremony for 274 servicemembers on Joint Base Balad, Iraq, November 11th, 2008
US Army photo by Kiyoshi Freeman

Hundreds of Servicemembers Re-enlist During Veterans Day Ceremony
Thursday, 13 November 2008

JOINT BASE BALAD — Nearly 300 servicemembers stationed across Iraq gathered at Holt Stadium here Tuesday to re-enlist in what officials said is the largest mass re-enlistment in the base’s history.

After helicopter and convoy movements and rehearsals, 274 servicemembers swore oaths to defend their country again.

“We gather today to remind ourselves that our mission as fighting men and women must continue,” Army Brig. Gen. Michael Lally, commander of 3rd Sustainment Command and the host for the event, said. “To continue, we must have those that are willing, able and are inspired to raise their hands again and again to be counted with those that came before them.”

To the re-enlisting servicemembers, the significance of holding the ceremony on Veterans Day was important.

“Every Veterans Day has been big for us in uniform,” said Army Sgt. Juan Rojas, a cook with the 297th ITC and a Miami native. “It gives me great pleasure to be here and be part of history.”

Army Col. Kevin O’Connell, commander of 1st Sustainment Brigade, said Soldiers stay in the Army for the same reasons they join: training, education, adventure, money. But the most important reason they stay in the military is service to their nation, he added.

“They’re patriotic,” O’Connell said. “They want to serve in an all-volunteer Army … to give back to a great nation what it’s given to them.”

While she was not planning to make the Army her career, said Army Sgt. Latasha Myers, a mechanic with the 503rd Maintenance Company, her experiences and the people she works with inspired her to re-enlist.

“I love what I do,” she said. “I love fighting for my country.”

O’Connell said friends and families should be proud of what their sons and daughters did this day.

“They re-enlisted on a big day, while they’re in combat. They continue to serve when their nation needs them — when we’re in conflict,” he said. “They’re our future.”

Lally said the re-enlisting servicemembers are common men and women who always have done, and will continue to do, uncommon things.

“The stories of those in front of you are still being written,” he said. “Today another chapter has begun. Wherever they go, whatever they do, each story will be different. Each will contain trials and deployments, and tales from lands yet to be seen. However, the common theme in each will be their selfless service and their universal commitment.”

(American Forces Press Service)

(source)

B*N*S*N4

Boys Club

Local Iraqi children pose for the camera while taking part in festivities during a ribbon cutting ceremony for a newly installed micro-power generator in Muhallah 137, Sheikh Umar, eastern Baghdad, Iraq, on Nov. 9, 2008. Photo by Staff Sgt. James Selesnick. (source)