Instruments of Love and Harmony #11

From Zenit.org comes Final Statement of Catholic-Muslim Forum “Called to Be Instruments of Love and Harmony”
For background information about the meetings, see this Reuters article of 11/06/08.

The statement includes an enumerated list of fifteen points which present a target rich environment In this installment, I’ll take on the thirteenth point of agreement.[Links & emphasis added.]

Young people are the future of religious communities and of societies as a whole. Increasingly, they will be living in multicultural and multireligious societies. It is essential that they be well formed in their own religious traditions and well informed about other cultures and religions.

Taken at face value, the thirteenth point means that the participants accept the concept of transmitting their own religious tenets & traditions to their offspring. They also agree that their children should be informed about the doctrines & traditions of other faiths.

The hidden subtext is especially subversive. They can’t mean genuine, fact based instruction; they must mean prejudicial, fantasy based indoctrination. As evidence, I submit the multitude of deceptions exposed in previous installments in this series. Honest instruction would expose the lies in the joint statement. If students in Catholic schools were required to read the hateful & warmongering passages in Islam’s canon of scripture, tradition & jurisprudence, how would their parents react? How would CAIR react? Guess what Muslim students study in the Madrassahs.

Click this link for A Common Word between Us and You, which precipitated the recent meetings. [Note the Events section, a recent addition to the page]. A Common Word’s home page includes a summary, the missive, media reports, blog posts and various responses from Christian & Jewish leaders. Click this link: Islamic Extortion Letter for my original dissection of the missive or this link: Go Burn With Muhammad, a blog devoted to dissecting the missive and reactions to it.

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B*N*S*N1

HMS Kent’s ship’s company were excited to see eager family and friends waiting on the jetty, pleased to be reunited in time for Christmas
[Picture: LA(Phot) Owen King]

News Article

HMS Kent sails home from the Far East

A People In Defence news article

18 Dec 08

The crew of HMS Kent arrived home just in time for Christmas when the ship sailed in to a royal reception at Portsmouth this week, after returning from a six-month deployment to South East Asia and the Far East.

His Royal Highness Prince Michael of Kent, brother of the ship’s sponsor, Princess Alexandra, and Honorary Rear Admiral of the Royal Naval Reserve, met the Type 23 frigate when she anchored in the Solent on Monday 15 December 2008. The Prince spent a couple of hours on board and met some the 174 crew before the ship began her short journey into Portsmouth Naval Base.

HMS Kent sailed from the UK on 1 June 2008 and visited China, Japan, Indonesia, Sri Lanka and many more countries, demonstrating the UK’s ongoing commitment to the region.

Kent conducted several high-level, multi-national exercises with navies from the United States, China, Australia, New Zealand, Singapore and Malaysia….

Go read the rest here.

B*N*S*N1

HMS Kent’s ship’s company were excited to see eager family and friends waiting on the jetty, pleased to be reunited in time for Christmas
[Picture: LA(Phot) Owen King]

News Article

HMS Kent sails home from the Far East

A People In Defence news article

18 Dec 08

The crew of HMS Kent arrived home just in time for Christmas when the ship sailed in to a royal reception at Portsmouth this week, after returning from a six-month deployment to South East Asia and the Far East.

His Royal Highness Prince Michael of Kent, brother of the ship’s sponsor, Princess Alexandra, and Honorary Rear Admiral of the Royal Naval Reserve, met the Type 23 frigate when she anchored in the Solent on Monday 15 December 2008. The Prince spent a couple of hours on board and met some the 174 crew before the ship began her short journey into Portsmouth Naval Base.

HMS Kent sailed from the UK on 1 June 2008 and visited China, Japan, Indonesia, Sri Lanka and many more countries, demonstrating the UK’s ongoing commitment to the region.

Kent conducted several high-level, multi-national exercises with navies from the United States, China, Australia, New Zealand, Singapore and Malaysia….

Go read the rest here.

B*N*S*N2

Dhahir Al-Musa, owner of al Medina newspaper, and Muhammad Al-Tamimi, general manager, look over a finished copy of their newspaper, Dec. 17, 2008. Photo by Scott Flenner, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division Public Affairs.

Freedom of the Press in Sadr City

Thursday, 18 December 2008

By Scott Flenner
4th Infantry Division

BAGHDAD — A monumental achievement was accomplished recently in the highly populated Baghdad district of Sadr City, with the publication of al Medina, the first ever local newspaper.

Al Medina is a locally produced and locally owned newspaper that focuses on current news affecting the people of Sadr City.

“It is a source to express their ideas, report their activities, and cover all the projects in the area” said Mr. Muhammad al-Tamimi, general manger of al Medina newspaper.

The paper was conceived more than five months ago when Maj. Mike Humphreys, a public affairs officer with Multi-National Division – Baghdad, had a chance encounter with Muhammad, a journalist, and a Sadr City businessman, Dhahir al-Musa.

During their initial meeting Humphreys, a native of Greeneville, Tenn., expressed his vision to create an independent SadrCity newspaper that could get the people’s message out. In cooperation with the embedded Provincial Reconstruction Team 3, Humphreys offered $25,000 in quick reaction funds to help the two entrepreneurs get their paper started.

“I knew we needed a paper in Sadr City,” Humphreys said. “I believe that one key to success in Iraq is a free and independent press that educates and informs the people while holding government officials accountable.”

Dhahir, who currently owns the newspaper, and Muhammad graciously accepted Humphreys offer and have already begun putting that money to good use. As of today al Medina newspaper has produced six issues at 10,000 copies each that have been distributed throughout the Sadr City District.

“If god willing the paper will continue to grow” said Muhammad. “The people of Sadr City have suffered. This paper can be their voice so the government does not forget them.”..(source: MNF-1 here)

B*N*S*N2

Dhahir Al-Musa, owner of al Medina newspaper, and Muhammad Al-Tamimi, general manager, look over a finished copy of their newspaper, Dec. 17, 2008. Photo by Scott Flenner, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division Public Affairs.

Freedom of the Press in Sadr City

Thursday, 18 December 2008

By Scott Flenner
4th Infantry Division

BAGHDAD — A monumental achievement was accomplished recently in the highly populated Baghdad district of Sadr City, with the publication of al Medina, the first ever local newspaper.

Al Medina is a locally produced and locally owned newspaper that focuses on current news affecting the people of Sadr City.

“It is a source to express their ideas, report their activities, and cover all the projects in the area” said Mr. Muhammad al-Tamimi, general manger of al Medina newspaper.

The paper was conceived more than five months ago when Maj. Mike Humphreys, a public affairs officer with Multi-National Division – Baghdad, had a chance encounter with Muhammad, a journalist, and a Sadr City businessman, Dhahir al-Musa.

During their initial meeting Humphreys, a native of Greeneville, Tenn., expressed his vision to create an independent SadrCity newspaper that could get the people’s message out. In cooperation with the embedded Provincial Reconstruction Team 3, Humphreys offered $25,000 in quick reaction funds to help the two entrepreneurs get their paper started.

“I knew we needed a paper in Sadr City,” Humphreys said. “I believe that one key to success in Iraq is a free and independent press that educates and informs the people while holding government officials accountable.”

Dhahir, who currently owns the newspaper, and Muhammad graciously accepted Humphreys offer and have already begun putting that money to good use. As of today al Medina newspaper has produced six issues at 10,000 copies each that have been distributed throughout the Sadr City District.

“If god willing the paper will continue to grow” said Muhammad. “The people of Sadr City have suffered. This paper can be their voice so the government does not forget them.”..(source: MNF-1 here)

B*N*S*N3

As many as 800 solar-powered street lights have been put up in Fallujah by the Army Corps of Engineers, and the Corps expects to place as many as 600-700 more. Photo by U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

Solar power helping light streets of Iraq

Dec 16, 2008
BY C. Todd Lopez

WASHINGTON (Army News Service, Dec. 16, 2008) — Mostly desert and a lot of sun, it makes sense there’s a place for solar power in Iraq.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Iraqi government are using solar energy to light the dark streets of Baghdad, Basra, Fallujah, Kharma and Sakalaweyah.

“The lights that we installed have an 80-watt panel on them, a lead-acid battery and a 18-watt fluorescent light bulb on them,” said John Offen, an engineer with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. “To date, we’ve installed about a little over 800 of them, and they’re operating just fine. And we still have about 600-700 more to go. The city of Fallujah didn’t have power at night and this was an easy way to light up the streets that didn’t depend upon any remote source of power.”….(Read more here)

B*N*S*N3

As many as 800 solar-powered street lights have been put up in Fallujah by the Army Corps of Engineers, and the Corps expects to place as many as 600-700 more. Photo by U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

Solar power helping light streets of Iraq

Dec 16, 2008
BY C. Todd Lopez

WASHINGTON (Army News Service, Dec. 16, 2008) — Mostly desert and a lot of sun, it makes sense there’s a place for solar power in Iraq.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Iraqi government are using solar energy to light the dark streets of Baghdad, Basra, Fallujah, Kharma and Sakalaweyah.

“The lights that we installed have an 80-watt panel on them, a lead-acid battery and a 18-watt fluorescent light bulb on them,” said John Offen, an engineer with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. “To date, we’ve installed about a little over 800 of them, and they’re operating just fine. And we still have about 600-700 more to go. The city of Fallujah didn’t have power at night and this was an easy way to light up the streets that didn’t depend upon any remote source of power.”….(Read more here)