B*N*S*N2

Debbie Kilpatrick, a former member of the Women’s Arrmy Corps and now an environmental protection specialist at Fort Lee, Va., looks through the history of the WAC at the U.S. Army Women’s Museum at Fort Lee. Photo by Amy Perry

File under: I didn’t know this:

Army observes 30th anniversary of integrating WACs

Oct 20, 2008
BY Melissa K. Wiford

WASHINGTON (Army News Service, Oct. 20, 2008) — Thirty years ago, on Oct. 20, 1978, President Jimmy Carter signed Public Law 95-485 disbanding the Women’s Army Corps as a separate corps within the United States Army following 36 years of dedicated service.

Beginning today and until mid November, the Army will be celebrating the 30th anniversary of the full integration of women into the regular Army, said Lt. Col. Mike Moose, spokesperson for the Army’s Deputy Chief of Staff for Personnel, G-1. He said the G-1 is looking for former members of the Womens Army Corps who might like to share their stories and memories with both internal and external audiences.

Originally established as the Women’s Army Auxiliary Corps, or WAAC by President Franklin D. Roosevelt during World War II, the WAC went through many different organizational statuses throughout its history…

There is lots more here.

And there is more, on the links on that page:

WAAC Recruiting Poster

Photo by Army Heritage Museum
October 20, 2008

Womens Auxiliary Army Corps Recruiting Poster in the Army Heritage Museum Poster Collection at Carlisle Barracks, Pa. (here)

Go check it out.

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B*N*S*N2

Debbie Kilpatrick, a former member of the Women’s Arrmy Corps and now an environmental protection specialist at Fort Lee, Va., looks through the history of the WAC at the U.S. Army Women’s Museum at Fort Lee. Photo by Amy Perry

File under: I didn’t know this:

Army observes 30th anniversary of integrating WACs

Oct 20, 2008
BY Melissa K. Wiford

WASHINGTON (Army News Service, Oct. 20, 2008) — Thirty years ago, on Oct. 20, 1978, President Jimmy Carter signed Public Law 95-485 disbanding the Women’s Army Corps as a separate corps within the United States Army following 36 years of dedicated service.

Beginning today and until mid November, the Army will be celebrating the 30th anniversary of the full integration of women into the regular Army, said Lt. Col. Mike Moose, spokesperson for the Army’s Deputy Chief of Staff for Personnel, G-1. He said the G-1 is looking for former members of the Womens Army Corps who might like to share their stories and memories with both internal and external audiences.

Originally established as the Women’s Army Auxiliary Corps, or WAAC by President Franklin D. Roosevelt during World War II, the WAC went through many different organizational statuses throughout its history…

There is lots more here.

And there is more, on the links on that page:

WAAC Recruiting Poster

Photo by Army Heritage Museum
October 20, 2008

Womens Auxiliary Army Corps Recruiting Poster in the Army Heritage Museum Poster Collection at Carlisle Barracks, Pa. (here)

Go check it out.