Savage’s Call for the Fairness Doctrine–in Hollywood


I often listen to Michael Savage on my way home from work. Monday, he was rather irate over the fall of the Academy Awards and how it’s become yet another outlet for (these are my words, not his) for spoiled, overpaid, egotistical children to vent their spleens and expose their BDS, while seeing who can outcrass whom and who can be the most egregiously secular and “avante garde” in their boredom with life and hatred of America.

Quite a while ago, I also posted an article regarding “decent” movies here.

Well, Michael Savage has had ENOUGH of the murderer, pimp, whore, drunk, addict, ad nauseum being made to look like the “good guy” while the real good guys–cops, soldiers, presidents, WHITE MEN continue to be made to look like evil incarnate. So he called for the “Fairness Doctrine” to be applied to Hollywood and for every rotten movie in which the good guys/bad guys are reversed, Hollywood be forced to make a good movie with the roles in their proper order.

I love it.

He then went on to read the United States Motion Picture Production Code of 1930–what the guidelines were for making movies in days gone by and what contributed to the “classics” we have today. Not the junk being foisted upon us.

Here then, I provide the United States Motion Picture Production Code of 1930.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

For the television broadcasting term, please see production code number.

The Production Code (also known as the Hays Code) was the set of industry censorship guidelines governing the production of American motion pictures. The Motion Pictures Producers and Distributors Association (MPPDA), which later became the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA), adopted the code in 1930, began effectively enforcing it in 1934, and abandoned it in 1967 in favor of the subsequent MPAA film rating system. The Production Code spelled out what was morally acceptable and morally unacceptable content for motion pictures produced for a public audience in the U.S.A.

The Production Code enumerated three “General Principles” As Follows:


1. No picture shall be produced that will lower the moral standards of those who see it. Hence the sympathy of the audience should never be thrown to the side of crime, wrongdoing, evil or sin.

2. Correct standards of life, subject only to the requirements of drama and entertainment, shall be presented.

3. Law, natural or human, shall not be ridiculed, nor shall sympathy be created for its violation.

Specific restrictions were spelled out as “Particular Applications” of these principles:


4. Nudity and suggestive dances were prohibited.

5. The ridicule of religion was forbidden, and ministers of religion were not to be represented as comic characters or villains.

6. The depiction of illegal drug use was forbidden, as well as the use of liquor, “when not required by the plot or for proper characterization.”

7. Methods of crime (e.g. safe-cracking, arson, smuggling) were not to be explicitly presented.

8. References to alleged “sex perversion” (such as homosexuality) and venereal disease were forbidden, as were depictions of childbirth.

9. The language section banned various words and phrases that were considered to be offensive.

10. Murder scenes had to be filmed in a way that would discourage imitations in real life, and brutal killings could not be shown in detail. “Revenge in modern times” was not to be justified.

11. The sanctity of marriage and the home had to be upheld. “Pictures shall not imply that low forms of sex relationship are the accepted or common thing.” Adultery and illicit sex, although recognized as sometimes necessary to the plot, could not be explicit or justified and were not supposed to be presented as an attractive option.

12. Portrayals of miscegenation were forbidden.

13. “Scenes of Passion” were not to be introduced when not essential to the plot. “Excessive and lustful kissing” was to be avoided, along with any other treatment that might “stimulate the lower and baser element.”

14. The flag of the United States was to be treated respectfully, and the people and history of other nations were to be presented “fairly.”

15. The treatment of “Vulgarity,” defined as “low, disgusting, unpleasant, though not necessarily evil, subjects” must be “subject to the dictates of good taste.” Capital punishment, “third-degree methods,” cruelty to children and animals, prostitution and surgical operations were to be handled with similar sensitivity.

So, tell me–which movies today would be allowed to be shown if they were forced to follow the code? These movies coming out today are supposed to be something you’d want to watch with your family? The filth being shoved down our throats as entertainment?

And people wonder why I don’t go to the movie theater any more–why should I give my hard earned money to these empty headed mannequins and support their nonsensical world views? That’s why I just wait for the dvd to come out–what I choose, when I choose and only those I would be comfortable being caught watching if my grandchildren popped in. And it’s not a lot, either.

Hollywood, you’re so great at making a spectacle of yourself with your demands–let’s demand the “Fairness Doctrine” be applied to you for a change.

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Savage’s Call for the Fairness Doctrine–in Hollywood


I often listen to Michael Savage on my way home from work. Monday, he was rather irate over the fall of the Academy Awards and how it’s become yet another outlet for (these are my words, not his) for spoiled, overpaid, egotistical children to vent their spleens and expose their BDS, while seeing who can outcrass whom and who can be the most egregiously secular and “avante garde” in their boredom with life and hatred of America.

Quite a while ago, I also posted an article regarding “decent” movies here.

Well, Michael Savage has had ENOUGH of the murderer, pimp, whore, drunk, addict, ad nauseum being made to look like the “good guy” while the real good guys–cops, soldiers, presidents, WHITE MEN continue to be made to look like evil incarnate. So he called for the “Fairness Doctrine” to be applied to Hollywood and for every rotten movie in which the good guys/bad guys are reversed, Hollywood be forced to make a good movie with the roles in their proper order.

I love it.

He then went on to read the United States Motion Picture Production Code of 1930–what the guidelines were for making movies in days gone by and what contributed to the “classics” we have today. Not the junk being foisted upon us.

Here then, I provide the United States Motion Picture Production Code of 1930.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

For the television broadcasting term, please see production code number.

The Production Code (also known as the Hays Code) was the set of industry censorship guidelines governing the production of American motion pictures. The Motion Pictures Producers and Distributors Association (MPPDA), which later became the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA), adopted the code in 1930, began effectively enforcing it in 1934, and abandoned it in 1967 in favor of the subsequent MPAA film rating system. The Production Code spelled out what was morally acceptable and morally unacceptable content for motion pictures produced for a public audience in the U.S.A.

The Production Code enumerated three “General Principles” As Follows:


1. No picture shall be produced that will lower the moral standards of those who see it. Hence the sympathy of the audience should never be thrown to the side of crime, wrongdoing, evil or sin.

2. Correct standards of life, subject only to the requirements of drama and entertainment, shall be presented.

3. Law, natural or human, shall not be ridiculed, nor shall sympathy be created for its violation.

Specific restrictions were spelled out as “Particular Applications” of these principles:


4. Nudity and suggestive dances were prohibited.

5. The ridicule of religion was forbidden, and ministers of religion were not to be represented as comic characters or villains.

6. The depiction of illegal drug use was forbidden, as well as the use of liquor, “when not required by the plot or for proper characterization.”

7. Methods of crime (e.g. safe-cracking, arson, smuggling) were not to be explicitly presented.

8. References to alleged “sex perversion” (such as homosexuality) and venereal disease were forbidden, as were depictions of childbirth.

9. The language section banned various words and phrases that were considered to be offensive.

10. Murder scenes had to be filmed in a way that would discourage imitations in real life, and brutal killings could not be shown in detail. “Revenge in modern times” was not to be justified.

11. The sanctity of marriage and the home had to be upheld. “Pictures shall not imply that low forms of sex relationship are the accepted or common thing.” Adultery and illicit sex, although recognized as sometimes necessary to the plot, could not be explicit or justified and were not supposed to be presented as an attractive option.

12. Portrayals of miscegenation were forbidden.

13. “Scenes of Passion” were not to be introduced when not essential to the plot. “Excessive and lustful kissing” was to be avoided, along with any other treatment that might “stimulate the lower and baser element.”

14. The flag of the United States was to be treated respectfully, and the people and history of other nations were to be presented “fairly.”

15. The treatment of “Vulgarity,” defined as “low, disgusting, unpleasant, though not necessarily evil, subjects” must be “subject to the dictates of good taste.” Capital punishment, “third-degree methods,” cruelty to children and animals, prostitution and surgical operations were to be handled with similar sensitivity.

So, tell me–which movies today would be allowed to be shown if they were forced to follow the code? These movies coming out today are supposed to be something you’d want to watch with your family? The filth being shoved down our throats as entertainment?

And people wonder why I don’t go to the movie theater any more–why should I give my hard earned money to these empty headed mannequins and support their nonsensical world views? That’s why I just wait for the dvd to come out–what I choose, when I choose and only those I would be comfortable being caught watching if my grandchildren popped in. And it’s not a lot, either.

Hollywood, you’re so great at making a spectacle of yourself with your demands–let’s demand the “Fairness Doctrine” be applied to you for a change.

Savage’s Call for the Fairness Doctrine–in Hollywood


I often listen to Michael Savage on my way home from work. Monday, he was rather irate over the fall of the Academy Awards and how it’s become yet another outlet for (these are my words, not his) for spoiled, overpaid, egotistical children to vent their spleens and expose their BDS, while seeing who can outcrass whom and who can be the most egregiously secular and “avante garde” in their boredom with life and hatred of America.

Quite a while ago, I also posted an article regarding “decent” movies here.

Well, Michael Savage has had ENOUGH of the murderer, pimp, whore, drunk, addict, ad nauseum being made to look like the “good guy” while the real good guys–cops, soldiers, presidents, WHITE MEN continue to be made to look like evil incarnate. So he called for the “Fairness Doctrine” to be applied to Hollywood and for every rotten movie in which the good guys/bad guys are reversed, Hollywood be forced to make a good movie with the roles in their proper order.

I love it.

He then went on to read the United States Motion Picture Production Code of 1930–what the guidelines were for making movies in days gone by and what contributed to the “classics” we have today. Not the junk being foisted upon us.

Here then, I provide the United States Motion Picture Production Code of 1930.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

For the television broadcasting term, please see production code number.

The Production Code (also known as the Hays Code) was the set of industry censorship guidelines governing the production of American motion pictures. The Motion Pictures Producers and Distributors Association (MPPDA), which later became the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA), adopted the code in 1930, began effectively enforcing it in 1934, and abandoned it in 1967 in favor of the subsequent MPAA film rating system. The Production Code spelled out what was morally acceptable and morally unacceptable content for motion pictures produced for a public audience in the U.S.A.

The Production Code enumerated three “General Principles” As Follows:


1. No picture shall be produced that will lower the moral standards of those who see it. Hence the sympathy of the audience should never be thrown to the side of crime, wrongdoing, evil or sin.

2. Correct standards of life, subject only to the requirements of drama and entertainment, shall be presented.

3. Law, natural or human, shall not be ridiculed, nor shall sympathy be created for its violation.

Specific restrictions were spelled out as “Particular Applications” of these principles:


4. Nudity and suggestive dances were prohibited.

5. The ridicule of religion was forbidden, and ministers of religion were not to be represented as comic characters or villains.

6. The depiction of illegal drug use was forbidden, as well as the use of liquor, “when not required by the plot or for proper characterization.”

7. Methods of crime (e.g. safe-cracking, arson, smuggling) were not to be explicitly presented.

8. References to alleged “sex perversion” (such as homosexuality) and venereal disease were forbidden, as were depictions of childbirth.

9. The language section banned various words and phrases that were considered to be offensive.

10. Murder scenes had to be filmed in a way that would discourage imitations in real life, and brutal killings could not be shown in detail. “Revenge in modern times” was not to be justified.

11. The sanctity of marriage and the home had to be upheld. “Pictures shall not imply that low forms of sex relationship are the accepted or common thing.” Adultery and illicit sex, although recognized as sometimes necessary to the plot, could not be explicit or justified and were not supposed to be presented as an attractive option.

12. Portrayals of miscegenation were forbidden.

13. “Scenes of Passion” were not to be introduced when not essential to the plot. “Excessive and lustful kissing” was to be avoided, along with any other treatment that might “stimulate the lower and baser element.”

14. The flag of the United States was to be treated respectfully, and the people and history of other nations were to be presented “fairly.”

15. The treatment of “Vulgarity,” defined as “low, disgusting, unpleasant, though not necessarily evil, subjects” must be “subject to the dictates of good taste.” Capital punishment, “third-degree methods,” cruelty to children and animals, prostitution and surgical operations were to be handled with similar sensitivity.

So, tell me–which movies today would be allowed to be shown if they were forced to follow the code? These movies coming out today are supposed to be something you’d want to watch with your family? The filth being shoved down our throats as entertainment?

And people wonder why I don’t go to the movie theater any more–why should I give my hard earned money to these empty headed mannequins and support their nonsensical world views? That’s why I just wait for the dvd to come out–what I choose, when I choose and only those I would be comfortable being caught watching if my grandchildren popped in. And it’s not a lot, either.

Hollywood, you’re so great at making a spectacle of yourself with your demands–let’s demand the “Fairness Doctrine” be applied to you for a change.

Whatever Happened to DECENT Movies?


This article came to my email and can be found at OneNewsNow.

It poses a fundamental question–where has the decency in entertainment gone?


Most of us–from our youth–remember the Catholics banned movies and books based on morality issues, even if one wasn’t Catholic. They still do, actually, and in the United States it’s known as the National Catholic Legion of Decency. Trouble is, no one pays attention anymore.

In my opinion? Both the Hays Code and the Legion of Decency need to be brought back into the sphere of the everyday. Maybe we wouldn’t have the garbage on TV, the radio (hip hop bullshit), movies, books, etc., that are so rampant today. And, maybe if we quit “rewarding” the makers of this garbage, including the “entertainers” that thrive on shock and immorality, reducing them to the gutters of porn where they belong, we could get the country back on track and rebuild its greatness.

A prime example? Brad and Angelina. Oh yes, they adopt children. SO WHAT? She’s in love with her father (Conservative spokesman Jon Voight), admitted she set out to separate and cause the divorce between Brad and Jennifer Aniston when the two of them worked on Mr. and Mrs. Smith, refuses to marry him, bears a child out of wedlock (yes, my two youngest are also technically “bastards”, so guess what? I get to criticise) and this is held up as exemplary behaviour? In whose deluded world?

Bastard children are glorified (no, they shouldn’t be blamed for being born–their parents should be ashamed of depriving the children of a two parent household, except under severe extenuating circumstances)–IF they’re allowed to be born at all in the abortion death cult atmostphere. Divorce, drugs, partying all night while the kids are left with nanny’s, bedhopping, adultery, belittling God and Christianity, spouting treason, associating with terrorists and their friends–all that’s considered NORMAL.

Because we’ve gotten away from the basic decencies of humanity, simple basic morality. So, yes, bring back the Hays Code and the Legion of Decency. And, while you’re at it, find a way to bring back Joseph McCarthy and Hollywood/Politician blacklisting. Sound extreme? Too bad–extreme times call for extreme measures.

Here’s the article:

Marcia Segelstein – Guest Columnist OneNewsNow.comSeptember 24, 2007 Marcia Segelstein

Movies with no nudity, profanity, and ridicule of religion? Believe it or not, it used to be that way … and it took no government intervention — only public outcry. It can happen again.

Many years ago, my first job out of college was working as a secretary for the Department of Program Practices at CBS. (It was essentially the censorship department, but nobody used that term.) My duties included typing up instructions for the Programming Department regarding what objectionable language had to be cut from various movies that would air on the network. The editors I worked for also had to keep track of instances of smoking, drinking, and if I’m not mistaken, use of phrases like “Oh my God” and other potentially offensive content. In those days, at least, there was concern on the part of the networks — not only CBS — about airing material viewers might find inappropriate.

Since it was long before cable, and the networks had licenses that had to be renewed, TV was pretty innocent. Early evenings were considered family viewing time, and the programs reflected that. The fact that children might be watching was taken into account. Guidelines for standards and practices existed and were enforced.

And believe it or not, there was a time when moviemakers also followed a code of content. Starting in the 1930’s, the Motion Pictures Producers and Distributors Association (which later became the Motion Picture Association of America) adopted the Hays Code. Some of its general principles read as follows: “No picture shall be produced that will lower the moral standards of those who see it …. Correct standards of life, subject only to the requirements of drama and entertainment, shall be presented.”

The Hays Code also included some specific restrictions: nudity was prohibited; the ridicule of religion was forbidden; specific language was banned; the sanctity of marriage and the home had to be upheld; and “excessive and lustful kissing” was to be avoided.

Sounds positively idyllic, doesn’t it … and like an impossible dream now.

And guess what prompted it all? Public outcry. Public outcry over perceived immorality in the movies and in the lives of Hollywood stars. In a nutshell, the public wanted Hollywood to clean up its act. Will H. Hays, who headed up the Motion Pictures Producers and Distributors Association, set out to project a positive image of the movie industry. The Production Code (which became known as the Hays Code) was written, and for eight years Hays tried to enforce it, with little effect. But public pressure continued from organizations such as The Catholic Legion of Decency which declared certain films “indecent” and encouraged boycotts. Finally an amendment to the code required all films to obtain a certificate of approval prior to release. So for the next 30 years, up until the 1960s, virtually all movies made in the U.S. adhered to the Hays Code.

It’s remarkable to think that such standards once existed, and perhaps even more remarkable to think that public pressure was the driving force behind them. Amazing also that the government had nothing to do with it all. In fact, Hollywood studios adhered to the self-regulation in large measure to avoid government censorship.

My, how the world has changed. Take the current movie, The Ten. According to a write-up in WORLD Magazine, the film is a series of ten vignettes in which characters “find new and creative ways to shatter the commandments.” (So much for not ridiculing religion.) In one, a librarian vacations in Mexico where she has an affair with Jesus. Yes, that Jesus. In another, a doctor murders his patients “as a goof,” and ends up in jail as another inmate’s “wife.” That’s where coveting comes in apparently. Enough said.

Today, not only is there no self-regulation, there’s no cohesive public outcry to motivate self-regulation. Occasionally I hear outrage expressed from religious groups over films they consider blasphemous and blatantly anti-religious. But why don’t religious organizations do what the Catholic Legion of Decency used to do and encourage boycotts of “indecent” films — films which lower our moral standards? Surely religious leaders across the spectrum could take the lead in raising public outcry.

Our expectations have been lowered to the point where we expect crude language, immorality and disrespect for religion and family. We’re surprised when a good film is made that doesn’t contain anything offensive. We no longer expect films to be uplifting or to reflect our values. We’ve bought into the lie that “there’s no going back.”

We must raise our expectations, speak out against films that further coarsen the culture, and demand once again that Hollywood clean up its act. We should ask our religious leaders to lead the way. Public outcry helped change the course of Hollywood history in the 1930s. There’s no reason why it can’t be changed again with enough public support. Time to fire up your moral outrage.

Join the Christians Against Leftist Heresy blogroll sponsored by Faultline USA

Whatever Happened to DECENT Movies?


This article came to my email and can be found at OneNewsNow.

It poses a fundamental question–where has the decency in entertainment gone?


Most of us–from our youth–remember the Catholics banned movies and books based on morality issues, even if one wasn’t Catholic. They still do, actually, and in the United States it’s known as the National Catholic Legion of Decency. Trouble is, no one pays attention anymore.

In my opinion? Both the Hays Code and the Legion of Decency need to be brought back into the sphere of the everyday. Maybe we wouldn’t have the garbage on TV, the radio (hip hop bullshit), movies, books, etc., that are so rampant today. And, maybe if we quit “rewarding” the makers of this garbage, including the “entertainers” that thrive on shock and immorality, reducing them to the gutters of porn where they belong, we could get the country back on track and rebuild its greatness.

A prime example? Brad and Angelina. Oh yes, they adopt children. SO WHAT? She’s in love with her father (Conservative spokesman Jon Voight), admitted she set out to separate and cause the divorce between Brad and Jennifer Aniston when the two of them worked on Mr. and Mrs. Smith, refuses to marry him, bears a child out of wedlock (yes, my two youngest are also technically “bastards”, so guess what? I get to criticise) and this is held up as exemplary behaviour? In whose deluded world?

Bastard children are glorified (no, they shouldn’t be blamed for being born–their parents should be ashamed of depriving the children of a two parent household, except under severe extenuating circumstances)–IF they’re allowed to be born at all in the abortion death cult atmostphere. Divorce, drugs, partying all night while the kids are left with nanny’s, bedhopping, adultery, belittling God and Christianity, spouting treason, associating with terrorists and their friends–all that’s considered NORMAL.

Because we’ve gotten away from the basic decencies of humanity, simple basic morality. So, yes, bring back the Hays Code and the Legion of Decency. And, while you’re at it, find a way to bring back Joseph McCarthy and Hollywood/Politician blacklisting. Sound extreme? Too bad–extreme times call for extreme measures.

Here’s the article:

Marcia Segelstein – Guest Columnist OneNewsNow.comSeptember 24, 2007 Marcia Segelstein

Movies with no nudity, profanity, and ridicule of religion? Believe it or not, it used to be that way … and it took no government intervention — only public outcry. It can happen again.

Many years ago, my first job out of college was working as a secretary for the Department of Program Practices at CBS. (It was essentially the censorship department, but nobody used that term.) My duties included typing up instructions for the Programming Department regarding what objectionable language had to be cut from various movies that would air on the network. The editors I worked for also had to keep track of instances of smoking, drinking, and if I’m not mistaken, use of phrases like “Oh my God” and other potentially offensive content. In those days, at least, there was concern on the part of the networks — not only CBS — about airing material viewers might find inappropriate.

Since it was long before cable, and the networks had licenses that had to be renewed, TV was pretty innocent. Early evenings were considered family viewing time, and the programs reflected that. The fact that children might be watching was taken into account. Guidelines for standards and practices existed and were enforced.

And believe it or not, there was a time when moviemakers also followed a code of content. Starting in the 1930’s, the Motion Pictures Producers and Distributors Association (which later became the Motion Picture Association of America) adopted the Hays Code. Some of its general principles read as follows: “No picture shall be produced that will lower the moral standards of those who see it …. Correct standards of life, subject only to the requirements of drama and entertainment, shall be presented.”

The Hays Code also included some specific restrictions: nudity was prohibited; the ridicule of religion was forbidden; specific language was banned; the sanctity of marriage and the home had to be upheld; and “excessive and lustful kissing” was to be avoided.

Sounds positively idyllic, doesn’t it … and like an impossible dream now.

And guess what prompted it all? Public outcry. Public outcry over perceived immorality in the movies and in the lives of Hollywood stars. In a nutshell, the public wanted Hollywood to clean up its act. Will H. Hays, who headed up the Motion Pictures Producers and Distributors Association, set out to project a positive image of the movie industry. The Production Code (which became known as the Hays Code) was written, and for eight years Hays tried to enforce it, with little effect. But public pressure continued from organizations such as The Catholic Legion of Decency which declared certain films “indecent” and encouraged boycotts. Finally an amendment to the code required all films to obtain a certificate of approval prior to release. So for the next 30 years, up until the 1960s, virtually all movies made in the U.S. adhered to the Hays Code.

It’s remarkable to think that such standards once existed, and perhaps even more remarkable to think that public pressure was the driving force behind them. Amazing also that the government had nothing to do with it all. In fact, Hollywood studios adhered to the self-regulation in large measure to avoid government censorship.

My, how the world has changed. Take the current movie, The Ten. According to a write-up in WORLD Magazine, the film is a series of ten vignettes in which characters “find new and creative ways to shatter the commandments.” (So much for not ridiculing religion.) In one, a librarian vacations in Mexico where she has an affair with Jesus. Yes, that Jesus. In another, a doctor murders his patients “as a goof,” and ends up in jail as another inmate’s “wife.” That’s where coveting comes in apparently. Enough said.

Today, not only is there no self-regulation, there’s no cohesive public outcry to motivate self-regulation. Occasionally I hear outrage expressed from religious groups over films they consider blasphemous and blatantly anti-religious. But why don’t religious organizations do what the Catholic Legion of Decency used to do and encourage boycotts of “indecent” films — films which lower our moral standards? Surely religious leaders across the spectrum could take the lead in raising public outcry.

Our expectations have been lowered to the point where we expect crude language, immorality and disrespect for religion and family. We’re surprised when a good film is made that doesn’t contain anything offensive. We no longer expect films to be uplifting or to reflect our values. We’ve bought into the lie that “there’s no going back.”

We must raise our expectations, speak out against films that further coarsen the culture, and demand once again that Hollywood clean up its act. We should ask our religious leaders to lead the way. Public outcry helped change the course of Hollywood history in the 1930s. There’s no reason why it can’t be changed again with enough public support. Time to fire up your moral outrage.

Join the Christians Against Leftist Heresy blogroll sponsored by Faultline USA